Our 2018 Endorsements

The OEC Action Fund and the OEC Action Fund PAC endorses candidates and ballot initiatives that represent the conservation and environmental values of Ohio communities. Our endorsements have a record of taking action to ensure safe air, clean water, and preservation of Ohio's outdoor heritage. We support candidates, regardless of party, who prioritize the health of our families and the future of our planet.

See how the OEC Action Fund’s endorsed candidates stacked up this election in our 2018 Election Report.

For Ohio Governor, we endorse: 

Richard Cordray. Cordray has made environmental issues a key part of his campaign. With a focus on clean energy and halting wind setbacks, Cordray is determined to bring new jobs to Ohio and secure our clean energy future. Cordray is also devoted to farmers and will find a way to regulate chemical use to prevent harmful algae-blooms in Lake Erie. Cordray has proven he can make sure that our environment is put first for the health and safety of Ohio families.  

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Richard Cordray (D)

For Auditor of State, we endorse:

Zack Space. As a former Public Defender and Congressman, Space has seen firsthand how gerrymandered districts silence Ohioans. He has made fair redistricting a top priority of his campaign and will make sure our voices and our votes are heard on the issues we care about most.

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For United States Senate, we endorse:

Senator Sherrod Brown. Throughout his career, Sen. Brown has worked hard for Ohio. From protecting Lake Erie from toxic algae, to defending our children’s ability to breathe by supporting smart policies to address air pollution, Ohioans are lucky to have an environmental champion like Sen. Sherrod Brown. His vocal, bold leadership helps our state move in the right direction.

 John Cranley for Mayor

Senator Sherrod Brown (D)

For Ohio Senate, we endorse:

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Nickie Antonio

(D-Lakewood)

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Teresa Fedor

(D-Toledo)

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Melinda Miller

(D-Newark)

For Ohio House, we endorse:

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Erica Crawley

(D-Columbus)

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Sedrick Denson

(D-Cincinnati)

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Laura Lanese

(R-Grove City)

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Beth Liston

(D-Worthington)

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John Patterson

(D-Ashtabula)

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Michael Skindell

(D-Lakewood)

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Cassimir Svigelj

(D-Rocky River)

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Casey Weinstein

(D-Hudson)

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Erik Yassenoff

(R-Upper Arlington)

For better parks throughout Ohio, we endorse:

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PASSED: Columbus & Franklin County Metro Parks

The Columbus & Franklin County Metro Parks, which feature 20 outstanding natural area parks with more than 230 miles of trails and over 27,500 acres of land in seven Central Ohio counties.This levy will provide a sound financial base for operating and improving existing parks, as well as opening new parks for the preservation of public lands for future enjoyment.

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PASSED: Five Rivers MetroParks

The Five Rivers MetroParks encompasses 30 locations, including 18 parks and conservation areas. The 16,000 acre park system protects vital forest, grassland, farmland and wetland habitats. The Five Rivers MetroParks levy would provide operational funding, keep the parks free for visitors, and prepare for additional land purchases in the future. 

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Ross County Park District

The Ross County Park District provides the best possible outdoor experience for the citizens of Ross County through nature conservation and education, health and wellness opportunities, and secure, well maintained recreational facilities. The Ross County Park District levy would provide vital funding for 22 miles of paved trails and 14 bridges, without which, will likely be shut down.

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PASSED: Worthington Electric Aggregation – Issue 39

For the past two decades, Worthington City Council—in conjunction with Worthington residents—has identified environmental sustainability as one of its top three community priorities. Issue 39 would give the Worthington City Council the authority to pool the community’s buying power with the goal of lowering household electric bills and increasing renewable energy usage. If approved, the City could negotiate a bulk price on behalf of its residents and small businesses for purchasing electricity.